Talking is a Gift

Home » blog post » The Last Word on Drama

The Last Word on Drama

When drama is used effectively in public speaking, there are many advantages. But all of us have been in a service or at an event where the drama didn’t play out quite so well. So, this week, we provide you with a few important things to consider when planning to utilize the dramatic arts! Also, see below for resources to get you started!

There are some disadvantages of drama in public speaking. Both the audience and the speaker may struggle with creativity in communication. When taken to the extreme, any of these factors can become disadvantages of the dramatic arts in public speaking.

  • Overuse – Drama should be used occasionally as a special feature rather than using it often.
  • Mediocrity – If used, drama should be well done. The only thing worse than no drama is bad drama. “Bathrobe drama” is the term for bad drama, implying drama by untrained performers using ideas and materials at hand.
  • Overspending – Expenses for dramatic productions mount rapidly. Avoid exceeding the budget and causing financial pressure.
  • Shock Factor – Dramatization should be used in good taste to avoid making the audience uncomfortable. Shock usually detracts from the message.
  • Special Effects – “Bells and whistles” as well as props and noisemakers should be used to enhance drama not distract from the message.
  • Embellishment – Drama should not alter the Scripture text or overstate the message. The truth should be creatively but accurately presented.
  • Manipulation – Emotions are a part of well-done drama. Healthy expression of feelings is recommended rather than extreme emotional control.
  • Camouflage – The point of the message must be clear through the drama, not lost in the creative expression.
  • Mismatch – The type of drama should be appropriate for the audience. Know the crowd and select drama personally for it.

Beware of these risks of dramatic expression. Adhere to the cautions and benefit from the advantages of drama.

One of the advantages for dramatic expression today is the availability of resources. There are many reference books, internet websites, and professional organizations for the dramatic arts. The most important resources for Christian drama are the Bible and life experience. The following resources for drama are helpful also. They offer general information as well as scripts, training, and networking.

Books

  • Actors Not Included: The Complete Works of Matt Tullos by Matt Tullos
  • Art for God’s Sake by Philip Graham Ryken
  • Christian Playwriting and Self-Publishing by Cleveland O. Mcleish
  • The Complete Guide to Church Play Production by John Lewis and others
  • Create a Drama Ministry by Paul Miller
  • Developing the Church Drama Ministry by Paul Miller
  • Devoted Through Drama: Monologues, Plays, and Skits for Christian Youth Groups by Kimberly Smiley
  • Drama: Church Drama for Church Folks by Barbara Dudley

Many children’s books and classic works of literature provide excellent scripts for drama.

Websites

  • Christian Drama Resources (www.christiandramaresources.com)
  • Christian Plays (www.christplay.com)
  • Creative Pastors with Ed Young (www.creativepastors.com)
  • Drama Share: Your Christian Drama Resource Center (www.dramashare.org)
  • Online Journal of Christian Communication and Culture (www.ojccc.org)
  • Wordspring Creative Resources (www.wordspring.com)

These drama websites were active at the time of publication. Other websites may be developed to provide resources for different forms of drama.

Drama and the creative arts have been a part of the church for centuries. In New Testament times, the church led the culture in developing the arts, specifically drama.[3] Though banned from the church at times, the dramatic arts have been powerful tools in worship when used appropriately. Dramatic arts in ministry today can reach the lost world with the gospel and the saved followers of Christ through discipleship. According to David Taylor: “Our emotions, bodies, and imaginations have a vital role, and the arts serve to bring them into an intentional and intensive participation.”[4]

            [1] “Christian dramatists form new association,” http://bpnews.net/bpnews.asp?id=4819 (cited 20 March 2013), Baptist Press, (Baptist Press, 2013).

            [2] http://www.wordspring.com/?page_id=1416 (cited 20 March 2013) Wordspring Creative Resources.

            [3] Julie W, “A Biblical Perspective of Drama in Ministry,” Online Journal of Christian Communication and Culture, entry posted December 11, 2011, http://www.ojccc.org/2011/12/a-biblical-perspective-of-drama-in-ministry/ (accessed March 20, 2013).

            [4] David Taylor, “Discipling the Eyes Through Art in Worship,” http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2012/april/art-in-worship.html (cited 20 March 2013),  Christianity Today (Christianity Today, 2013).


1 Comment

  1. From watching a few church skits, I would also warn against extended soliloquies. Unless the speech is particularly moving and well-written, people tend to zone out rather quickly.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: