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Dress Your Best

Public speakers never have a second chance to make a first impression. While a person need not be a beauty to speak to groups, appearance and clothing are an important part of the speaker’s image. Neat appearance and appropriate clothing display professionalism and confidence. On the other hand, untidy appearance and inappropriate clothing can distract the listener and diminish the speaker’s credibility. Christian speakers should always look their best to represent the Lord well.

Florence and Marita Littauer have written and spoken about personality types for many years. They discuss how personality affects style of communication in their book, Communication Plus: How to Speak So People will Listen. Personality is definitely expressed in the clothing, hairstyle, and makeup of a speaker.[1] They suggest four different personalities with four different looks. While no two people are exactly alike, each personality tends to wear clothes of a particular style.

            Popular Sanguine: bright colors, sparkles and bling, flamboyant clothing, unique styles

            Powerful Choleric: bright colors, simple prints, tailored style, business professional

            Perfect Melancholy: muted tones, classic cuts, traditional styles, simple elegance

            Peaceful Phlegmatic: earthy tones, flowing fabrics, relaxed fit, unstructured styles

Personality should be considered when shopping for clothing, accessories, and makeup.

Public speakers need to understand how personality impacts style of speaking and type of clothing. While appearance should reflect personality, clothing styles should not be extreme. The audience and occasion should be considered as well as the fit and comfort of the clothes. Clothing should not be distracting to the speaker or listeners. According to the Littauers: Regardless of your personality, it is important to put extra effort into dressing for the platform. The things that work on the stage may well be things that you would never wear to the store or office. But on the stage, in front of an audience, you want to have a look that sets you apart and lends dignity to your work.[2]

Some people have a natural sense of style and dress attractively without effort. Others must work harder to look their best. General ideas can be seen in fashion magazines. Clothing consultants or sales clerks can provide professional input. Speakers must wear clothing, hairstyles, and makeup appropriate for age, setting, and ministry. Timeless classics are recommended over faddish trends. Invest money in fashions that last and are made well. 

The speaking wardrobe should take into consideration appropriate attire, personal style, body type, and skin tones. Type of attire is determined by the occasion, setting, and audience. A speaker is wise to ask about dress for the event before arriving unprepared. It is a general rule of thumb for a speaker to wear clothing one level above the audience. If the audience wears jeans, the speaker should wear nice slacks. If the audience wears slacks, the speaker should wear a dressy pantsuit, skirt, or dress.

There are four different body types which determine how clothes look on a person. They are called by different names, though they generally describe the same basic shapes. Several fashion sources suggest these four categories: circle (thick around the middle), triangle (larger at the bottom), hourglass (curvy but evenly proportioned), and rectangle (straight up and down). Circle figures should wear loose fitting clothes around the middle and fitted pants; avoid high-rise pants, belts, and fitted tops. Triangle figures should wear tailored tops and fuller bottoms; avoid oversized sweaters, skinny jeans, and clingy skirts. Hourglass figures should wear fitted waistbands and belts; avoid shapeless tunics, baby–doll dresses, and oversized cardigans. Rectangle figures should wear fitted waists and flared bottoms to create curves; avoid clingy dresses, Empire–waist tops, and flowing skirts.[1] Women who know their body types and wear the appropriate clothes always have a more attractive and confident appearance.     

Colors also matter. Solid, bright (not neon) colors are usually flattering on all women. However, certain colors look better with specific skin tones. In 1980, Carole Jackson developed a color system called “Color Me Beautiful.” Based on the four seasons of the year, a woman’s natural skin tones determine the most complimentary color palate. See the chart below listing coloration and colors for each season. [2]

 Clothing makes a statement. Clean, neat clothes project a sense of pride and care. Dirty, disheveled clothes indicate lack of interest or even emotional distress. Stylish, coordinated clothes display attention to detail. From head to toe, clothing matters to women and to public speakers. Clothing need not send the wrong message: “I am worn out and out–of–date.” Clothing can project a positive image. Speakers should wear their best to speak their best. Personal style and event setting may vary. However, a speaker’s appearance should always be neat, modest, and appropriate. Comment below with any additional tips you have about the speaker’s wardrobe!

        

            [1] Littauer, Communication Plus, 174-176.

            [2] Ibid., 176.

    [1] Larson, Kristin. “The Right Clothes for Your Body Type,” http://www.realsimple.com/beauty-fashion/clothing/shopping-guide/right-clothes-your-body-type-00000000007925/index.html (cited March 20, 2013), Real Simple, (Time Inc. 2013).

            [2] Carole Jackson, Color Me Beautiful (New York: Ballentine Books, 1980).


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